Northern Red Bishop, the scarlet beauty found on the shores of Lake Baringo.

Photo by Tony Crocetta

Baringo, a shallow freshwater Lake, lies 110 km north of Nakuru town.  500 species of birds are one of its biggest draws. Baringo’s bird population rises and falls with the seasons. The dry season is normally the leanest time for birders, but the lakeshore resounds with birdsong at most times of year.

The shoreline is bursting with birds and photography is prime here because the birds quite approachable. Egrets, Herons, Kingfishers and Bee-eaters are the stars here.

If you are in the area at the right time of the year when the male Northern Red Bishop is on its full breeding plumage, you have the privilege to witness its courtship flight. Photographic opportunities are immense as the polygamous male tries to impress the females.  

This species is sexually dimorphic and polygynous, with the males being particularly larger than the females. The genus Euplectes is notorious for sexually selected characteristics, including elaborate displays and elongated tail feathers. The bright orange-to-yellow plumage with a contrasting dark black pigment is for attracting mates.

Northern Red Bishop inhabits tall open or bushed grassland. It closely associated with giant grasses and a tall crop like millet and sorghum, but also occurs in open habitats with ranks weedy vegetation. At night it roost in thicket or tall grass. Enjoy your birding.

Red-collared Widowbird (Euplectes ardens)

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These inhabitant of Kenya high altitudes grassland are known for their long tails and brilliant red badges, both which acts as sexual ornaments. During their breeding season, males spend incredible amount of time doing flight display with single intention of attracting females.

The photo appearing above was taken in Naro Moru River Lodge, located at the base of Mt.Kenya. This species is found throughout Central Kenya, with special emphasis given to open grassland while driving through this region.

The race found in Kenya is Euplectes ardens suahelicus, which apparently also appears in the highlands of Tanzania.